EE-361

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Revision as of 19:14, 6 February 2011

EE-361: Feedback Control Systems



Instructors

Dr. Abubakr Muhammad, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

Email: abubakr [at] lums.edu.pk

Office: Room 9-311A, 3rd Floor, SSE Bldg

Office Hours: TBA

Mr. Zeeshan Shareef, Teaching fellow

Email: zeeshan.sharif [at] lums.edu.pk

Office: Room 9-309, 3rd Floor, SSE Bldg

Mr. Talha Manzoor, Teaching Assistant

Email: talha.manzoor [at] lums.edu.pk

Office: Room 9-309, 3rd Floor, SSE Bldg

Course Details

Year: 2010-11

Semester: Spring

Category: Undergrad

Credits: 4

Core course for electrical engineering majors

Course Website: http://cyphynets.lums.edu.pk/index.php/EE-361

Course Description

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following, disturbance rejection, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design (Bode) techniques. Nyquist stability criterion. Design of dynamic compensators. State-space methods. Digitization and computer implementation issues. Integrated laboratory exercises on practical applications of control.


Objectives

The students should learn

  • Use of control for achieving desired behavior in unstable and uncertain systems.
  • Advantages and disadvantages of feedback in a system.
  • Open- and closed-loop control and their respective merits/demerits.
  • Stability and its relationship with feedback.
  • Techniques of linear time-invariant (LTI) control system design.
  • Pervasiveness of feedback and control in science & engineering.
  • Systems engineering tools for solving complex problems.

Learning Outcomes

The students will be able to:

  • Model physical systems, sensors and actuators in various settings using the language of signals and systems.
  • Identify state, measurement and control in a given problem.
  • Design controllers for linear models of systems using MATLAB and SIMULINK.
  • Implement digital controllers for various mechanical and electrical systems.
  • Predict and test control system performance.

Pre-requisites

Courses

Enforced: EE-210. Signals and Systems

Recommended: MATH2xx Linear Algebra-I

Topics

Laplace transform, differential equations, programming in MATLAB and C.

Text book

The course will be taught from the following textbook.

  • Feedback control of dynamical systems by Franklin, Powell and Emami-Naeni, Prentice Hall, 2006.

Other important references include

  • Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers by Karl Astrom and Richard Murray, Princeton University Press, 2008.
  • Signals and Systems by Alan V. Oppenheim, Alan S. Willsky with S. Hamid, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 1997.
  • Computer controlled systems by Karl Astrom and Bjorn Witternmark, Prentice Hall, 1997.

Grading Scheme

Homeworks+Quiz : 15%

Lab Performance: 20%

Midterm: 30%

Final : 35%

Policies and Guidelines

  • Quizzes will be announced. There will be no makeup quiz.
  • Homework will be due at the beginning of the class on the due date. Late homework will not be accepted.
  • You are allowed to collaborate on homework. However, copying solutions is absolutely not permitted. Offenders will be reported for disciplinary action as per university rules.
  • Any appeals on grading of homeworks, quiz or midterm scores must be resolved within one week of the return of graded material.
  • Attendance is in lectures and tutorials strongly recommended but not mandatory. However, you are responsible for catching the announcements made in the class.
  • Attendance in lab exercises is compulsory.
  • Many of the homeworks will include MATLAB based computer exercise. Some proficiency in programming numerical algorithms is essential for both the homework and project.

Course Delivery Method

Lectures. Tues, Thurs: 12:00pm-1:15pm. SC-1.

Labs. Mon, Wed: 10:00am-12:00 pm, 2pm-4pm. EE-Lab4. 5th Floor. SSE Bldg.

Schedule

WEEK SCHOOL CALENDAR COURSE CALENDAR TOPICS
Week 1. January 24 Jan 25. Classes begin. Lecture 1. Introduction to concepts of control, feedback, feedforward, uncertainty and robustness;
Week 2. January 31 Feb 1. Add/drop with full refund; Feb 5. Kashmir Day. Lecture 2. advantages of feedback control; process, plant, sensor, actuator, control and disturbance; cruise control example;

Lecture 3. Dynamical models; cruise control example revisited; introduction to On-Off and PID controllers

Lecture 4. Review of Laplace transforms; impulse response; convolution;

Lab 1. Introduction to SIMULINK environment and real-time data acquisition.

Week 3. February 7 Feb 10. Second payment deadline Lecture 5. Block diagrams; modeling examples; electromechanical systems;

Lecture 6. Modeling examples (contd.); First order models; linearization of nonlinear models; pendulum; model of internet congestion control (TCP);

Lab 2. Modeling systems and control in SIMULINK. Cruise control and water tank systems.

Week 4. February 14 Feb 16. Eid Milad-un-Nabi Lecture 7. Second order models of electrical and mechanical systems; rational transfer functions; poles and zeros; effects of pole positions in the complex plane; second order response; damping and natural frequency;


Lecture 8. Dynamic response. Unit impulse, step and ramp responses of first order systems; impulse and unit responses of second order system.

Lecture 9. Second order responses; rise time; peak time; overhoot; effect of zeros on response.

Week 5. February 21 Lecture 8. Internal stability and BIBO stability; stability of LTI systems; Routh's criterion for stability; examples on computing Routh's array.

Lecture 9. Examples on Routh's criterion (contd.); Errors in open loop and closed loop control; Robustness against disturbances; Bode's sensitivity function; Watt's problem of disturbance rejection.

Week 6. February 28 March 1. Drop with penalty Lecture 10. Bode's sensitivity function; Black's feedback amplifier design problem; comparing open loop and feedback topologies; compensating steady state errors; systems types.

Lecture 11. Problem solving session and Quiz.

Week 7. March 7 Lecture 12. Dynamic errors; PID control
Week 8. March 14 Midterm exams

Lecture 13. Limitations of P, PI, PD controllers; Implementation issues in PID; integrator anti-windup; digital implementaion of PID controller;

Midterm Exam.

Week 9. March 21 Mid semester break
Week 10. March 28 Lecture 14. Introduction to root locus design; motivational examples; MATLAB commands for drawing root-locus;

Lecture 15. Mathematical derivation of the six rules for drawing a general root-locus; connections with Routh Hurtwitz;

Week 11. April 4 Lecture 16. Examples of design using root locus; effects of additional poles and zeros; introduction to dynamic compensation;

Lecture 17. Lead, lag and notch compensators.

Week 12. April 11 Lecture 18. Introduction to state space analysis; block diagrams to state-space; canonical forms; state transformations;

Lecture 19. Controllability matrix; control canonical form; relation of poles and zeros to eigendecomposition;


Week 13. April 18 Lecture 20. Dynamic response in SS; full state feedback; derivation of control law; reference tracking;

Lecture 21. Pole placement; Ackermann's formula; feedback gains and controllability; estimators; observability; separation principle; design examples;

Week 14. April 25 Lecture 22.
Week 15. May 2
Week 16. May 9 May 9. Last day of classes; May 10-11. Reading and Reviewing period; May 12-18. Final Exams.
Week 17. May 16 May 14-21. Final Exams
Week 18. May 23 May 19-27. Semester break; May 31. Final grades submission
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